Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Meet Father of the Year, Joe Wethington, Who Didn't Quite Get His Daughter Killed

The teen had wanted to sky-dive as a high school graduation present. But she begged her parents to let her jump as a birthday present when she learned that the minimum age to jump alone in Oklahoma was 16. The U.S. Parachuting Association responded to the incident by raising the minimum age to 18 nationwide.

Makenzie's father, Joe Wethington, made the 200-mile drive to Oklahoma with her and was the first to jump from the plane that morning. The sky divers were making a static-line jump, where a lanyard attached to the plane is connected to the parachute, causing the chute to open automatically.

Wethington said that when his daughter jumped, her parachute opened only partially and she began to spin toward the ground.

Dallas News:  Texas teen who survived 3,000-foot fall in sky-diving accident wins $760,000 in lawsuit

That's known as a partial malfunction and it's not such a terribly rare thing.  However, the kid cracked-up but, amazingly, did not die and now she's blaming everyone up to the Fuller Brush man for it.


Her lawsuit claimed that she wasn't properly trained for the jump and that her parachute was inappropriate for her skill level. 

But Robert Swainson, who owned the now-closed Pegasus Air Sports Center in Chickasha, argued that Makenzie panicked during the jump and failed to follow instructions.

- DN

Father of the Year jumped that day as well so there's only one simple question:  where the fuck was he?  Did FOTY let her jump with an inappropriate parachute and with poor training without saying anything?

Makenzie's father, Joe Wethington, made the 200-mile drive to Oklahoma with her and was the first to jump from the plane that morning. The sky divers were making a static-line jump, where a lanyard attached to the plane is connected to the parachute, causing the chute to open automatically.

Wethington said that when his daughter jumped, her parachute opened only partially and she began to spin toward the ground.

- DN

You guessed it, didn't you.  That's exactly what he did.  Father of the Year was right there doing it too but never lifted one pinky finger to stop her or even give a clue, "That parachute is wrong, your training was shit, and you're just about to fuck yourself up massively."

Nooooo, don't tell her that.  If anything goes wrong then blame it on the jumpmaster.


Swainson, the chief instructor at Pegasus for more than three decades, disputed that, saying her parachute opened completely and that it had a slight turn — something he said she could have easily corrected using techniques from his five-hour class before the jump.

Swainson said he was unable to jump out of the plane to help — another sky diver got cold feet and protocol was for him to remain on the plane — but said the teen was receiving instructions during the jump through a radio in her helmet.

"There are other things you can do to stop the turn, but she didn't do anything," he said. "I think she just panicked."

- DN

He is probably right and Father of the Year sure as hell didn't do anything.

Ed:  he had already jumped.  How could he help?

He could have shown some parental responsibility as the more capable skydiver and let her go first because of just such a problem.  There's little parental responsibility that worthless fuck did not vacate.

The Federal Aviation Administration released a report in June 2014 saying that Makenzie's parachute was in good working condition at the time of the jump. It found no evidence of safety violations at Pegasus Air Sports Center.

Ultimately, U.S. District Judge Timothy DeGiusti ruled against Swainson, 70, who has since moved to the United Kingdom.

- DN

No wonder he left after all that bullshit here.


Joe Wethington, who had consented for his daughter to make the jump, later said it shouldn't have been allowed.

"I don't think she should have been allowed at 16 to go up there and perform that type of jump; no matter what I say or she says, she shouldn't have been allowed," he said. "I find it very hard to believe that the rules and regulations in Oklahoma are that lax."

- DN

That Oklahoma regulations are so lax as to permit under-age skydivers is precisely why Father of the Year took her in the first place.  As you see from the FAA analysis previously, there was nothing wrong with the parachute.


We haven't got to the beauty part yet.

Makenzie said a few weeks after the accident that if she could have done things differently, she would have waited to sky-dive later in life.

"It's definitely taught me there's a god and he's looking out for me," she said then.

- DN

How much more of an idiot can this sick bitch possibly manage.  If God exists, he wouldn't let anyone do such a stupid fucking thing and then expect us to pay for the folly of it.  We will pay for it since who the fuck do you think pays the huge insurance settlements.  Answer: all of us.

Since we now own Makenzie Wethington after buying her, we formally request she refrain from any more blindly stupid things unless they're considerably less expensive ones.  In the latter case, go ahead and kill yourself that way since your absence obviously won't cost the gene pool much.


These miserably-worthless modern thrillseekers expect their stunts to be perceived as so dangerous but if anything goes wrong, they screech, "You fucked me. It was your fault, you bastard."

Fuckin' people


Multiple of the regulars have taken a leap from an aircraft and what do you think would have happened if we had cracked-up that way.

Cadillac Man:  a bunch of weepy songs in a church and then Que Sera, Sera?

Roger that.

Cadillac Man:  well, not you, Silas.  No church will let you inside, dead or alive.

True that (sob)

2 comments:

Cadillac Man said...

I totally freaked from the time I got out on the strut. Despite four hours of instruction nothing prepares you for the first time. I completely blacked out and came to when the parachute opened. Then some guy started yelling at me on the headset ruining my high. All this and I was over 18, at least in physical years. Had the parachute not opened I would have been toast. Who's fault? It would make no difference to me after I went splat. However, what a way to go. One of the best first time experiences of my life. In my case, it was also the last time for sky diving. Subsequent landings have been inside a plane. UH!

Peas InOurThyme said...

I'm pleased to burn the father since he knew the situation and she didn't, even before they went to Oklahoma.

You saw how it goes when you leaped, that you have to be an instant expert if there's a malfunction and there's no way to practice that. I doubt any of us we would have survived (larfs).

We were ostensibly adults at that time so that makes a huge difference relative to chucking kids out of aircraft.

I don't know what it added to my life but definitely something. I'm glad we did it.