Sunday, April 16, 2017

PGM | World's Most Powerful Production Motorcycle

The PGM V8 motorcycle is an absolute brute.  Its whopping 1996cc, 90-degree V8 engine spins to 12,800 rpm to smash out 334 hp (249 kW) at the countershaft sprocket, while torque is a massive 214 Nm (158 ft-lbs). This thing will go through rear tyres like you and I go through clean underpants  (Atlas:  The Aussie-built 2-liter, 334-horsepower PGM V8 motorcycle)


Weight, fully-fueled, is 534 pounds and that's got to be a surprise.  How did they do keep it relatively low with such a monster of a motor.

The Atlas article is better for answering questions although not many can be answered just this minute and the video is best for watching the bike at speed and they're cagey about just how much speed it can make.  Maybe it cracks 200 mph ... higher?

The engine is so large it significantly alters the riding position and that's going to change the weight distribution quite a bit.

Interesting that the bike uses a chain since I don't think Harleys use chains at all anymore and instead only use belts.


Warning:  music prior to 1:30 is awful and best to kill it or at least turn it down.



"The iconic V8, reborn as an authentic motorcycle engine.  A meticulously crafted, compact and outrageously powerful motorcycle for the discerning rider."

The PGM motorcycle features a 90-degree 2L V8 engine producing 334hp @ 12800rpm / 214Nm @ 9500rpm. Australian built to the highest quality from front to back including MoTeC fuel injection, Brembo brakes, Akrapovic titanium exhaust and Marchesini forged alloy wheels. The PGM motorcycle weighs in at 242kg wet giving it one crazy power to weight ratio!

PGM is now taking orders for genuine interested parties. For more information go to: http://pgmv8.com.au

- YouTube

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Kevlar belts are fine for durability on a 60 70 or 80HP bike but hardly sufficient to handle the type of acceleration this bike would deliver but like the Demon I doubt it turns very well And any average bullet bike would eat it alive

Peas InOurThyme said...

Ah, there's the answer. Thank you.

The rider position looks kind of screwed for going deep into corners. I guess a good rider can handle anything but why bother when a bullet bike does it better. It does have a wild exhaust note, tho.

Anonymous said...

The NSR 500 was A Honda GP bike that tried to skirt the 4 cylinder rule by using an oval piston and run dual plugs. Never really worked but sounded awesome

Anonymous said...

The NSR 500 was A Honda GP bike that tried to skirt the 4 cylinder rule by using an oval piston and run dual plugs. Never really worked but sounded awesome

Peas InOurThyme said...

There are many jams on exhaust notes on YouTube with people presenting samples from the craziest vehicles but I never heard of one as nuts as that NSR.